Creative Destruction

May 3, 2007

What Do You Say To A Dead Athiest?

Filed under: Current Events — Off Colfax @ 9:53 pm

Lt. Col. Ralph Kauzlarich needs to look at things in a different manner.

When you die, I mean, there is supposedly a better life, right? Well, if you are an atheist and you don’t believe in anything, if you die, what is there to go to? Nothing. You are worm dirt. So for their son to die for nothing, and now he is no more — that is pretty hard to get your head around that. So I don’t know how an atheist thinks. I can only imagine that that would be pretty tough.

Tell me this: If you don’t have anything to look forward to after you die, then what greater sacrifice is there than to give your life? It is everything an atheist is, was, and ever will be. There is nothing else. There are no comforting thoughts as the world fades to black. There will be no eternal reward, no friends and family who have passed or are yet to pass…

Zilch. Nada. Nothing.

What greater sacrifice is it for an atheist to die for a cause? To die simply trying to do what is right and good and proper in this world because it is right and good and proper?

There is no greater sacrifice. Tillman’s death deserves to be treated with honor and respect.

I support Representative Henry Waxman’s call for Lt. Colonel Kauzlarich be brought on charges of conduct unbecoming an officer, only because there is no such article regarding “Conduct Unbecoming A Human Being” in the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

9 Comments »

  1. Clearly Kauzlarich is talking out of his ass and doesn’t know beans about atheism. One argument goes that because atheists don’t believe in an afterlife, that necessarily infuses life with greater meaning than the typical zealot, who is able to defer meaningful existence to an idealized afterlife in martyrdom. The promise of 76 virgins (or is is 72? because it’s an important difference) is one such belief.

    Comment by Brutus — May 3, 2007 @ 10:05 pm | Reply

  2. The promise of 76 virgins (or is is 72? because it’s an important difference) is one such belief.

    I’ve been told, but can’t verify because I don’t read the right language, that the virgins thing is really a mistranslation or mistranscription and it’s 72 or 76 raisins that
    the faithful will find waiting for them in the afterlife. (Almost wish I believed in that, just so I could contemplate the extreme disappointment in store for the 9-11 terrorists.)

    But I think that Kauzlarich is right about one thing: It is a hard thing to know that your child sacrificed him- or herself for the no good reason. Especially if you know it to be a true sacrifice and not a quick route to heaven after the short, unpleasant interlude of dying. All the more reason to NOT sacrifice people unnecessarily.

    So part of me wants to suggest that we only elect atheists who might be less willing to sacrifice people in foolish wars. The other, more cynical part thinks that atheists, particularly those capable of getting themselves elected, are just as likely as believers to be willing to sacrifice someone else or someone else’s kid to their cause.

    Comment by Dianne — May 4, 2007 @ 3:54 am | Reply

  3. Especially if you know it to be a true sacrifice and not a quick route to heaven…

    You mis-spelled “think”.😉

    Comment by Robert — May 4, 2007 @ 5:39 am | Reply

  4. About 3 years ago I dropped into a black hole – four months of absolute terror. I wanted to end my life, but somehow [Holy Spirit], I reached out to a friend who took me to hospital. I had three visits [hospital] in four months – I actually thought I was in hell. I imagine I was going through some sort of metamorphosis [mental, physical & spiritual]. I had been seeing a therapist [1994] on a regular basis, up until this point in time. I actually thought I would be locked away – but the hospital staff was very supportive [I had no control over my process]. I was released from hospital 16th September 1994, but my fear, pain & shame had only subsided a little. I remember this particular morning waking up [home] & my process would start up again [fear, pain, & shame]. No one could help me, not even my therapist [I was terrified]. I asked Jesus Christ to have mercy on me & forgive me my sins. Slowly, all my fear has dissipated & I believe Jesus delivered me from my “psychological prison.” I am a practicing Catholic & the Holy Spirit is my friend & strength; every day since then has been a joy & blessing. I deserve to go to hell for the life I have led, but Jesus through His sacrifice on the cross, delivered me from my inequities. John 3: 8, John 15: 26, are verses I can relate to, organically. He’s a real person who is with me all the time. I have so much joy & peace in my life, today, after a childhood spent in orphanages [England & Australia]. God LOVES me so much. Fear, pain, & shame, are no longer my constant companions. I just wanted to share my experience with you [Luke 8: 16 – 17].

    Peace Be With You
    Micky

    Comment by Micky — May 4, 2007 @ 5:59 am | Reply

  5. You mis-spelled “think”.

    I see your point, but will propose that I really misspelled “believe”.

    Comment by Dianne — May 4, 2007 @ 8:32 am | Reply

  6. Military officers ought to respect their troops. There is nothing wrong with admitting that you don’t understand them personally, but that can be said in a manner that doesn’t abuse them. By the time you get to Lt. Colonel, you ought to understand that point.

    Comment by ohwilleke — May 4, 2007 @ 2:57 pm | Reply

  7. Brought up on charges? Listen, I do think that it is a little offensive to imply that the Tillman’s aren’t upset about Pat’s death primarily because of the dishonesty surrounding it and to suggest that their lack of religious belief should be used as an excuse to ignore the validity of their complaints.

    However, I don’t see why what he said was so offensive. Essentially, he said that he had a hard time comprehending how people with no belief in an afterlife could deal with people dying. Maybe he said it in a rather harsh way, but I don’t think it warrants being brought up on charges.

    That’s crazy.

    Comment by Glaivester — May 4, 2007 @ 9:25 pm | Reply

  8. I’ve been told, but can’t verify because I don’t read the right language, that the virgins thing is really a mistranslation or mistranscription and it’s 72 or 76 raisins that the faithful will find waiting for them in the afterlife.

    That’s just sour grapes.

    Comment by Daran — May 5, 2007 @ 2:59 am | Reply

  9. The difference, I think, is whether you assume it is written in Syriac or not.

    Comment by Glaivester — May 5, 2007 @ 7:59 pm | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: