Creative Destruction

July 13, 2006

American Soldiers Arrested For Rape/Execution Of 14-Year Old Girl And Her Family

Filed under: Current Events,Feminist Issues,Iraq — Ampersand @ 2:03 pm

From the New York Times:

BAGHDAD, Iraq, July 6 — The United States ambassador and the top American military commander here together issued an unusual apology on Thursday for the rape and murder of a young Iraqi woman and the killing of her family, saying that the crime, in which at least four soldiers are suspects, had injured the “Iraqi people as a whole.”

I’ve seen many U.S. media stories make the same mistake the Times makes here. In virtually any context other than a crime committed by US soldiers, a 14 year old girl who was raped and murdered would be called a girl, not a “woman.”

“We understand this is painful, confusing and disturbing, not only to the family who lost a loved one, but to the Iraqi people as a whole,” the two senior officials said in a written statement. “The loss of a family member can never be undone. The alleged events of that day are absolutely inexcusable and unacceptable behavior.”

The statement is all the more unusual because no soldiers have been convicted yet or even formally charged.

Steven Green, accused rapist and murderer, and a painfully ironic headlineWhat I find unusual about the statement, as quoted, is that whoever wrote the “apology” didn’t even read the news reports, or he’d know that four people – Abeer Qasim Hamza, who was raped before she was shot in the head; her parents Qasim Hamza Rasheed al-Janabi and Fakhriya Taha Muheisin al-Janabi, and her six-year-old sister Hadeel Qasim Hamza al-Janabi – had been murdered.

Not “a loved one.” Four loved ones. (Abeer’s two younger brothers were fortunately not home, which is presumably why they’re still alive.)

Does it need to be mentioned that all five soldiers arrested so far have been men?

Heart has been doing outstanding blogging about this appalling hate crime (here, here, here). In her first post about the rape/murders, she quotes the lyrics of a song written by an American soldier. A video that found its way on to the internet showed “The song… performed before thousands of U.S. troops in Iraq who could be heard wildly cheering and laughing in the background.” In the song, a seductive Iraqi woman tempts an American Marine into her home, where she and her insurgent family attempt to murder him.

They pulled out their AKs so I could see

And they said…
Durka Durka Mohammed Jihad
Sherpa Sherpa Bak Allah

(with humorous emphasis:)
So I grabbed her little sister, and pulled her in front of me.

As the bullets began to fly
The blood sprayed from between her eyes
And then I laughed maniacally

Then I hid behind the TV
And I locked and loaded my M-16
And I blew those little f*ckers to eternity.

The soldier had been planning to release a recording of his song, but in light of recent events he’s put off (or perhaps been ordered to put off) those plans. Not canceled them, mind you. Put them off.

A couple of right-wing bloggers (here here and here) find it ridiculous that Heart sees a connection between an ever-so-funny song about shooting a sexy insurgent and her family to death, and the actual rape and murder that took place.

Seelhoff quotes the Hadji Girl song, and (with typical Feminist logic) segues from a discussion of a humorous skit of a Marine turning the tables on insurgents who attack him, to the case of several soldiers from the 101th Airborne Division of the US Army, not Marines, who have been accused by Iraqis of participating in an incident of rape and murder in the Iraqi city of Mahmoudiya.

(Note the author’s emphasis on the word “Iraqis” – the implication being that the story is not true. When this rape/murder was first reported in American media, the initial reaction of some in the rightosphere was to assume that it couldn’t possibly be true. See, for example, here and here: “…to take seriously the notion that FIVE soldiers gang-raped a girl, murdered her, burned her body, and then murdered her family to cover up the crime is simply beyond the pale. It would make a good movie script, but it’s just too far out there to even begin to take seriously.”)

I think Heart’s point is actually pretty simple: A culture in which a wacky novelty song about killing a seductive Iraqi insurgent and her family is popular and liked, is a culture that is encouraging misogyny and hate against women, and racist hate against all Iraqis. Did “Hadji Girl” cause these five soldiers to rape and murder? No, of course not. But the same cultural racism and misogyny that has (wrongly) convinced thousands of soldiers that “Hadji Girl” is acceptable as entertainment, also convinced these five (or possibly more than five?) men that it was acceptable to rape and murder an Iraqi family.

Oddly enough, right-wingers make this sort of connection all the time, when they (correctly) suggest that hateful anti-Israel propaganda stems is connected to murderous attacks on Israelis, even when there’s no evidence that any particular article was a direct cause of any particular attack. So why is the connection so hard to make when the hatred is directed at Iraqis and Iraqi women in particular?

I am in no way saying that this sort of thing is unique to Americans, or unique to soldiers. Gang-rape is always a weapon used against civilians — nearly always women and girls — in war, but it’s also used against civilians — nearly always women and girls — at home. Ms. Jared, in a comment left on Heart’s blog, linked to this recent story:

More arrests are likely in the rape of an 11-year-old girl by as many as 10 men, most of whom are football players at local community colleges, Fresno police said.

It’s not a coincidence that so many gang rapes are committed by young men in organizations – football, frat houses, the army, etc – which teach the young men that “being a man” is all-important. The sense of entitlement and manhood that convinced the young men in Fresno to rape is the same as the sense of entitlement and manhood that convinced the young men in Iraq to rape; the main difference, I would guess, is that the young men in Iraq had been subjected to a racist regime, devaluing Iraqi lives, which convinced them that it was all right to murder as well.

Please go read Heart’s posts. A lot of the info and links above came from Heart, and also from Feministing, Abyss2Hope, Feminist Law Profs, Footnotes From a Small Village, and Capitalism Bad Tree Pretty.

UPDATE: Ms. Jared, in comments, points me to this post from Riverbend, an Iraqi blogger:

Rape. The latest of American atrocities. Though it’s not really the latest- it’s just the one that’s being publicized the most. The poor girl Abeer was neither the first to be raped by American troops, nor will she be the last. The only reason this rape was brought to light and publicized is that her whole immediate family were killed along with her. Rape is a taboo subject in Iraq. Families don’t report rapes here, they avenge them. We’ve been hearing whisperings about rapes in American-controlled prisons and during sieges of towns like Haditha and Samarra for the last three years. The naiveté of Americans who can’t believe their ‘heroes’ are committing such atrocities is ridiculous. Who ever heard of an occupying army committing rape??? You raped the country, why not the people?

…Imagine your 14-year-old sister or your 14-year-old daughter. Imagine her being gang-raped by a group of psychopaths and then the girl was killed and her body burned to cover up the rape. Finally, her parents and her five-year-old sister were also killed. Hail the American heroes…

Read the whole thing.

40 Comments »

  1. A couple things.

    If true, the story is an outrage and the soldiers involved must be severely punished.

    The tentativeness about the label assigned to this female (girl or woman) probably stems from an ambiguous status. Was she acting socially as a woman or as a girl? IE, did she work, or was she in school. Did she live at home, or what. Not knowing those things, news outlets are probably unsure of what her appropriate social position label is.

    In any large group of people, there are going to be terrible crimes. I’m not sure that the “racist regime devaluing Iraqi lives” hypothesis holds up. What’s the rape rate in Iraq between US soldiers and local civilians? How does it compare to the rape rate back in the US, where presumably racist devaluation of Iraqiness isn’t a factor?

    Big conclusion from small data point, in other words.

    Comment by Robert — July 13, 2006 @ 3:04 pm | Reply

  2. A couple of right-wing bloggers (here here and here) find it ridiculous that Heart sees a connection between an ever-so-funny song about shooting a sexy insurgent and her family to death, and the actual rape and murder that took place.

    I am not sure I see the connection either, though I do not find the song funny at all. I know a couple of guys who served in Iraq, and that sort of “jesting” was rather common. I do not think the one caused the other, but that both are a product of the overall situation. The song in and of itself is probably a means for soldiers to disconnect from the fact that have to hurt and kill other humans. Dehumanizing the Iraqis may make it easier for them to at least tune out the normal emotional responses a person would have, especially when the soldiers are continuously under stress and threat of attack.

    Likewise, many soldiers often become “deadened” or “numb” as a result of watching so many people they have grown close to die. That could definitely cause an individual soldier to want to enact “revenge.” I am not saying it is right or moral, but it is not unexpected.

    I also do not understand where the “racist regime” or “culture of misogyny” comments come from. In war, particularly prolonged, unpopular wars, these sorts of violent actions happen. That is not to say they are appropriate or “right,” but they are common and not unique to one particular type of culture. They are also not unique gender. To fault either is quite unfair since no culture is “less racist” than another and virtually all combatants are male.

    And more small thing. This statement: “Gang-rape is always a weapon used against civilians — nearly always women and girls… is statistically inaccurate.

    Comment by toysoldier — July 13, 2006 @ 6:01 pm | Reply

  3. Correct link to Toysoldier’s cite here.

    (“HTML police! Step out of the editor with your tags closed!”)

    Comment by Robert — July 13, 2006 @ 6:04 pm | Reply

  4. I am in no way saying that this sort of thing is unique to Americans, or unique to soldiers. Gang-rape is always a weapon used against civilians — nearly always women and girls — in war, but it’s also used against civilians — nearly always women and girls — at home…

    Ms. Jared, in a comment left on Heart’s blog, linked to this recent story:

    More arrests are likely in the rape of an 11-year-old girl by as many as 10 men, most of whom are football players at local community colleges, Fresno police said.

    It’s not a coincidence that so many gang rapes are committed by young men in organizations – football, frat houses, the army, etc – which teach the young men that “being a man” is all-important.

    What about the fact that, in the U.S., the majority of interracial gang rapes are black-on-white, not white-on-black? Should that tell us anything?

    If the football players who raped the girl turn out to be black, and if the girl turns out to be white (IF, mind you, they very well may not) should we notice that fact and analyze it the same way we analyze their belonging to a football team (i.e. what about black culture makes interracial gang rape [interracial rape in general, actually] more prevalent?).

    Could we link this to the constant tearing down of whites in much of black culture [and in liberal white culture] and the constant refrain of how racist white people are and how racist the system white people set up are? Could we link it to the constant stoking of resentment against whites?

    Or do we only look at the demographics of rape in cases where it fits into the white = oppressor male = oppressor paradigm?

    Comment by Glaivester — July 14, 2006 @ 2:47 am | Reply

  5. I know a couple of guys who served in Iraq, and that sort of “jesting” was rather common.

    What would you think of a song by an Iraqi “jestingly” speaking of blowing up an elementary school in the US in revenge for the bombing of a similar school in Iraq? Perhaps with a line about using a kindergartener as a human shield against the bullets of the police who came to try to stop the explosion? You might, if you wanted to be exceptionally fair minded, think that the stupid acts of one or a few individual Iraqis don’t necessarily reflect on the society. But what if the song were popular? What if the singer wanted to release it for wider play throughout the Middle East?

    The song in and of itself is probably a means for soldiers to disconnect from the fact that have to hurt and kill other humans. Dehumanizing the Iraqis may make it easier for them to at least tune out the normal emotional responses a person would have, especially when the soldiers are continuously under stress and threat of attack.

    I expect that you are right and don’t blame the individual soldiers for doing what they have to do to survive. But this statement pretty much destroys the argument that we’re in Iraq for the good of Iraqis.

    Comment by Dianne — July 14, 2006 @ 10:28 am | Reply

  6. But this statement pretty much destroys the argument that we’re in Iraq for the good of Iraqis.

    No it doesn’t. It might destroy the argument that the soldiers sat down one day and said “we need to go into Iraq and help those people, as part of our geopolitical calculus”. But nobody has ever made that argument.

    The mission in Iraq is very hard on the soldiers being asked to carry out that mission. The psychological tricks those soldiers might have to employ don’t credit or discredit the mission, or its motivation.

    Comment by Robert — July 14, 2006 @ 11:17 am | Reply

  7. Robert:

    The mission in Iraq is very hard on the soldiers being asked to carry out that mission. The psychological tricks those soldiers might have to employ don’t credit or discredit the mission, or its motivation.

    Nonsense. The end in the means-ends equation is not divorced from the means. Those who have a noble mission but use barbaric means to achieve it doesn’t get credit for their nobility and a pass on their barbarism.

    Comment by Brutus — July 14, 2006 @ 12:02 pm | Reply

  8. What about the fact that, in the U.S., the majority of interracial gang rapes are black-on-white, not white-on-black? Should that tell us anything?

    Glaiv, why imagine I would take a white supremacist like Jared Taylor seriously as a source of crime statistics?

    What next? Are you going to cite the KKK as a source of facts? Or maybe Hitler (who your source Taylor seems to be a fan of)?

    The stats on gang rape in the document you link to do not have any links or supporting references, so we don’t know where they come from; they have never been subjected to peer review; they are, in short, worthless.

    But even if that wasn’t the case, stating raw numbers without doing any statistical work is obviously bad methodology. A reasonable comparison has to account for what proportion of blacks encounter whites and vice versa; has to distinguish between blacks, non-white Hispanics, white Hispanics, and whites; and ideally should adjust for confounding factors such as poverty rates and urbanization; etc.

    That’s if you’re concerned with legitimate numbers. But the source you linked to is only concerned with white supremacy, of course.

    Am I accusing you of being a white supremacist? No, because I have no idea if you are or not. But if you’re not, then you’re someone who can’t tell the difference between a legitimate source of facts and paranoid racist propaganda from a well-known white supremacist. I don’t intend to waste more time responding to you in the future.

    Comment by Ampersand — July 14, 2006 @ 12:13 pm | Reply

  9. The mission in Iraq is very hard on the soldiers being asked to carry out that mission.

    I know. I’ve seen the PTSD, among other problems, to prove it. As I said earlier, I don’t blame the soldiers for using whatever tricks they have to to survive, although I think dehumanizing Iraqis when Iraqi civilians aren’t even officially “the enemy” is probably not the best one, for reasons I’ll get into in the next paragraph.

    The psychological tricks those soldiers might have to employ don’t credit or discredit the mission, or its motivation.

    The motivation, maybe not. But it sure makes it hard for them to carry out the mission when the mission is peacekeeping or rebuilding Iraq. How can you rebuild a country when you have contempt for its citizens? If US soldiers in Iraq think that the idea of using a child as a human shield is a good one, even as a joke, I don’t see how they can possibly be reasonable people to try to reconstruct Iraq.

    Comment by Dianne — July 14, 2006 @ 4:15 pm | Reply

  10. Oh, by the way, just to be clear:

    If these soldiers did what they were accused of, I think that anyon who participated in the rape or who knowingly killed people in order to facilitate the rape (or who knowingly killed innocents) ought to be sentenced to life imprisonment. At a minimum.

    I think that there should be a full investigaton and whatever the results are, they should be made public.

    Comment by Glaivester — July 14, 2006 @ 4:22 pm | Reply

  11. Glaiv, why imagine I would take a white supremacist like Jared Taylor seriously as a source of crime statistics?

    I’m not a fan of his politics, but I don’t think his statistics here are lies.

    The stats on gang rape in the document you link to do not have any links or supporting references, so we don’t know where they come from; they have never been subjected to peer review; they are, in short, worthless.

    I’ll try to get some data on where the stats came from. But if we are only going to us peer-reviewed stuff, can you find a primary reference for the “2% or fewer of rape charges are false” statistic?

    But even if that wasn’t the case, stating raw numbers without doing any statistical work is obviously bad methodology. A reasonable comparison has to account for what proportion of blacks encounter whites and vice versa;

    If we were talking about the proportion of white rape victims who were raped by blacks, you would be correct; or the proportion of black rape victims who were raped by whites. But we are talking the total number of rapes. So the only way that this could skew the statstics is if black men were more likely to be in the vicinity of white woman than white men are to be in the vicinity of black women. (As most rapes are male-on-female). If we look at interracial marriage rates as a proxy for this statistic, then black men are around white women about three times as much as vice versa, I suppose that this is somewhat true, but it is not as great a discrepancy as in the rape statistics (~15 times).

    has to distinguish between blacks, non-white Hispanics, white Hispanics, and whites;

    Which would be good, if the government kept statistics on Hispanic crime rates (they don’t; Hispanics are considered white or black). But seriously, if we so divided up the statistics, do you honestly think that breaking down the interracial rape rate into Hispanic and non-Hispanic would show the non-Hispanic white rate to be higher than the overall white rate?

    and ideally should adjust for confounding factors such as poverty rates and urbanization; etc.

    Because if poverty correlates with being a rapist, then poverty must cause a person to be a rapist; that’s the only direction in which causality can go.

    In any case, my point is not to try to put blacks down. My point is that it seems disingenuous to only look for patterns in rape when it fits into the “white male as oppressor” paradigm.

    Comment by Glaivester — July 14, 2006 @ 6:07 pm | Reply

  12. The end in the means-ends equation is not divorced from the means. Those who have a noble mission but use barbaric means to achieve it doesn’t get credit for their nobility and a pass on their barbarism.

    Agreed. They should get credit for their nobility and discredit for their barbarism.

    But let’s be clear: war is barbaric – if not intentionally so then at least foreseeably so. Any rational choice to go to war will likely rest on an acknowledgment that great harm will result, coupled with a belief that the war will allow even greater good (or forestall even greater harm).

    When the barbarism in question is, in effect, telling dead baby jokes to music, I’m underwhelmed. While I thought Fahrenheit 9/11 had many compelling images, the image of soldiers treating their combat duties as video games didn’t bother me. We hope for a greater reverence for life during peacetime, but I am not surprised that this attitude takes a back seat during war. The soldiers in question may in fact be sociopaths; or they may simply be taking advantage of whatever psychological aids they have to do a brutal job. Ultimately the proof of the pudding is in the eating, not in the cooking.

    When the barbarism in question is rape and murder, you have my attention. This is a crime, and should be prosecuted as such. But I don’t know what it says about the larger military campaign. Similarly, I never had any perspective about the extent of the problems with UN Peacekeepers raping the people they were supposed to be protecting. People who want to discredit soldiers – whether they are in refugee camps, in Iraq, in Japanese military bases, or in Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri – can always examples of prostitution and rape. But I rarely hear evidence about whether the incidences of prostitution and rape are greater than if the soldiers had not been deployed.

    Every case of rape and murder offends me, and needs to be prosecuted, whether committed by military or civilians. But I fail to see the policy implications of individual cases; in contrast, I easily see the propoganda implications.

    Comment by nobody.really — July 14, 2006 @ 6:53 pm | Reply

  13. In the context of a guerilla war rape is in some ways more damning than murder; murder can always be excused with “I thought they were insurgents” or “I thought they were trying to kill me.” I tend to be sympathetic with soldiers who shoot first and ask questions later because they are really, really scared that they will die if they don’t shoot and the person is an insurgent.

    On the other hand, while someone can come up with a plaudsible excuse for killing someone in a war situation, I can’t think of any reason why someone would be justified in raping someone. It’s not like rape can be an act of self-defense.

    So once a soldier rapes someone, any other actions connected to the rape (e.g. murdering the girl’s family) no longer have the benefit of the doubt.

    Comment by Glaivester — July 14, 2006 @ 10:10 pm | Reply

  14. What would you think of a song by an Iraqi “jestingly” speaking of blowing up an elementary school in the US in revenge for the bombing of a similar school in Iraq?

    I would find it equally disgusting, but in that instance the song is a response to the actions of U.S. soldiers in Iraq. The anger that created the song would entirely be justified as the Iraqis did not ask the U.S. for help; we simply invaded their country. That said, I doubt the majority of Americans condone or support the actions mentioned in the song.

    But it sure makes it hard for them to carry out the mission when the mission is peacekeeping or rebuilding Iraq. How can you rebuild a country when you have contempt for its citizens?

    Good question, but part of the reason for the contempt is that our forces were not sent there for the good of the Iraqis. That was something said only to sell the war to the American people. Iraqi people, of course, realized that from the beginning. Our occupation of their country has more to do with having an American presence in the region than it does rebuilding the country or protecting its citizens.

    Comment by toysoldier — July 15, 2006 @ 2:38 pm | Reply

  15. in the name of God all merciful all compassionate
    im an iraqi muslim praise belongs to God and i live in baghdad im sunni just like sister in God (abeer) may God have mercy upon her soul i just wanna say that in retaliation of killing our children muslims will kill your men if God is willing
    allah akbar allah akbar la ilah ila allah
    God is the strongest God is the strongest
    no god but God

    Comment by amar — July 22, 2006 @ 3:58 am | Reply

  16. ^This is what happens when we don’t treat people with respect. Retaliation.

    It’s happening now, and it is what will continue to happen in the foreseeable future. And can you blame them? If my 14 year old sister was raped and my whole family murdered, I would want revenge too, would you? If soliders want to make their jobs easier, perhaps they should try respecting foreign cilivians instead of raping and killing them. I don’t care about the reasons or the politics of this situation.. I just want it to stop.

    Comment by Lexi — September 19, 2006 @ 5:50 pm | Reply

  17. i agree, this is American people.. the worst of us..

    Comment by yaar — September 26, 2006 @ 9:05 pm | Reply

  18. to all those who are trying to justify this horrible act and support this song.here is the fact:According to an FBI affidavit filed in Green’s case, he and at least two others targeted the young woman and her family for a week before the attack, which was not revealed until witnesses came forward in late June.

    The soldiers drank alcohol, abandoned their checkpoint, changed clothes to avoid detection and headed to the victims’ house, about 200 yards from a U.S. checkpoint in the “Triangle of Death,” a Sunni Arab area south of Baghdad known for its violence, the affidavit said.

    CBS News correspondent David Martin reports that according to Green’s arrest warrant, two of the soldiers have already confessed, saying Green took the girl’s parents and younger sister into a bedroom and closed the door. Shots were fired and Green came out, saying, “I just killed them.” Green and one other soldier then raped the girl before Green shot her in the head, wrapped her body in a blanked and set it on fire.

    Seventeen American soldiers are facing murder charges, reports Martin, and the biggest case — the killing of 24 Iraqi civilians in Haditha — is still under investigation
    Also i want you all not to forget about what is happening inside the prisons in Iraq;American soldiers horribly humilating and raping Iraqi women and men.it is so easy to see the published pictures showing American soldiers doing so.Finally,were this girl your beloved,sister or relative,what would you do?
    were you that girl or man raped by the American soldiers ,what would your reaction be .then,you may understand that such horrible and inhuman acts and behaviour is what is creating terrorism and making that kind of hatred between The Iraqis and The American soldiers.
    please try to search and see the pictures I was talking about, then I am sure you will understand what I mean.

    Comment by Your sister in humanity;Dania — October 15, 2006 @ 5:22 pm | Reply

  19. Sister in Humanity – I can’t believe that an obviously educated female like yourself would make such a simplistic comment as – such horrible and inhuman acts and behaviour is what is creating terrorism – what? Terrorism was born of hatred, hatred that some countries who harbour envy, narrow minds, and brain wash youngsters into believing that the Americans and the American way of life are evil. There is another aspect to the horrific actions taken by those specific soldiers who “premeditated” the rape and murder of an innocent Iraqi family. Americans have a tendency to be blinded by fatigues, and like to live under the assumption that all people who join the military to defend this wonderful country, are good people. Obviously, these men were not moral, or men of character that the average John and Sally like to believe are protecting their freedoms. As for the song…not all consequences are felt on earth.

    Comment by Rhonda — November 19, 2006 @ 9:53 pm | Reply

  20. As a foreigner living in the US, I’m horrified by the “deshumanization” of Americans. I don’t know if that’s the right word but what I’m trying to say is that very few people I have met in the US seem to have feelings or morals. Most Americans are only interested in making money and they don’r care about cheating, stealing, killing, etc. as long as they get what they want. I believe Americans are a real threat to humanity and other countries should unite to stop their ambitions. Outside the US, specially in third world countries, there are rich cultures with much more civilized people. I think the world should be led by them and NOT by the primitive Americans. By the way, I’m not muslim or anything though the few muslims I have met in the US are actually very nice people with a lot of respect to life. It’s only the Americans that bother me.

    Comment by justice — March 13, 2007 @ 5:03 am | Reply

  21. you said:”You raped the country, why not the people?”
    In the “Update” it has been said:”Imagine your 14-year-old sister or your 14-year-old daughter. Imagine her being gang-raped by a group of psychopaths and then the girl was killed and her body burned to cover up the rape. Finally, her parents and her five-year-old sister were also killed. Hail the American heroes…”
    Now, I will tell you something :my comment is by no way simplisitic. Let us forget about these rapes that are occxurring around the whole world but I will never forget about the humiliating behaviour at Abu Ghrib Prison .By the way, have you seen the pictures I talked about in my previous comment?
    second of all,in the article”Early Warning”,which is published on the internet at http://www.washingtonpost.com/ ,William M. Arkin on National and Homeland Security asks:”600,000 Iraqis Killed By War, Credible?” This article was indeed published in October 13, 2006.please tell me what do you call this? Is this civilization, liberty or a “harbour of envy and narrow minds” as you call it .Tell me frankly Mr ,without ignoring facts, does not this create terrorism ? Does not this create hatred? Do you know that this “600,000 ” means “15,000 violent deaths a month, 500 violent deaths everyday — at that sustained level — for more than three years between March 2003 and June 2006″ ,as the writer of the article says .Now you judge this please.
    finally, i want to tell you or to inform you that niether the Arabs are brain washed into believing that the Americans and the American way of life are evil nor the Americans are so. I myself never think that the American people are evil –no at all.I only want such wars and acts of violence to stop or to be stopped,for I am sure that no one likes a weoman, a child or a man to be killed or to be humiliated at prisons like Abu Ghrib.
    However, I will be pleased to read your or anyone’s comment on what I have said.
    with love to all people all over the world
    Your Sister in Humanity

    Comment by Dania ,Your Sister in Humanity — March 17, 2007 @ 8:22 pm | Reply

  22. American Troops are sons of bitch…and Inshallah they are beating by Muslims at this time & wil beat more by muslims in the future…INSHALLAH

    Comment by MUHAMAD Kamran Khan — September 20, 2007 @ 1:46 am | Reply

  23. Mr. Khan, you’re at the wrong website. The DNC site is here.

    Comment by Robert — September 20, 2007 @ 12:01 pm | Reply

  24. This is disgusting. i don’t blame mr. khan for his hate towards american troops. they are all bastards. they’re all like: oh YAY lets rape iraqi girls(that we are so WILLINGLY trying to protect!) PFFT. my A**.YAY lets kill vietnamese people. YAY lets bomb japan. YAY LETS FCKING PICK ON THE IRAQI’S AND TORTURE THEM.

    GOd i hate them. Effing gay f*ckers. I hope these countries will get their revenge someday.

    FUCK YOU!

    Livvy x =)

    ps.american troops are all fugly bastards anyway.

    Bush looks like a monkey

    Comment by Olivia — September 30, 2007 @ 1:45 pm | Reply

  25. Nice post,

    Each time a group sends military men and women in combat with a belief that these low income, barely educated kids are “heroes” and “the best in the world” there goes a lot of the critical thinking needed to manage troops in a difficult environment. As in the normal population, a large majority are great individuals, but some are just felons waiting for the right opportunity.

    Soldiers are not Football players that need heart felt support. Soldiers are public workers who are asked to do a job, much like the police, the firemen, border guards, or postal carriers. Each time you give a group, any group, a blank check and say: “You can do no harm because you are godsent” you are calling for abuse.

    I also wonder why people who oppose women and gays in the military, see no problems with sending 100,000 young boys in a muslim country and keep them there for years.

    Comment by Vilon — December 4, 2007 @ 4:28 pm | Reply

  26. Pics or it didnt happen

    Comment by jacob — April 5, 2008 @ 8:21 pm | Reply

  27. [...] very very very very few – No they do not. And this is exactly why I’m moving… Case or two? American Soldiers Arrested For Rape/Execution Of 14-Year Old Girl And Her Family Creative Destructio… YouTube – US trained Ethiopian soldiers rape poor Somali women Photos Show Rape of Iraqi Women by [...]

    Pingback by Obama 'to rebuild moral stature' - Page 2 - Ultimate Teen Forums — November 24, 2008 @ 2:14 pm | Reply

  28. [...] – Five soldiers charged in Iraq rape-murder case – Jul 9, 2006 Raped and killed, in that order: American Soldiers Arrested For Rape/Execution Of 14-Year Old Girl And Her Family Creative Destruct… Cos lord knows there’s loads of threads going on with the endless debate that is AMERICA! With [...]

    Pingback by |Politics| The U.S military - Page 3 - MFG 5.1 Anime & Manga Forums — November 24, 2008 @ 9:00 pm | Reply

  29. So, they killed and raped iraqi people. So what? What’s the problem with that? Do I feel sorry for them? Hell No. One less of those mother F*ckers means more air for US to breath. As soon as you hear “americans kill iraqis” you freak out and say, how bad they are…BUT they are not. Just type in “american soldiers killed and tortuard in the middle east” and you will realize that what americans do is done so gracefully (compared what those F*uckers to to us) Those Bastards chop the heads off every american they get their hands on and burn their bodies while they celebrate. But that’s ok, right? Yeah…nobody remembers that! So, stop saying american Troops are horrible. They are not. IF IT WASN’T FOR THEM WE WOULD LIVE IN A LIFE LIVING HELL. GO ARMY!!!!!!!

    Comment by cowgirl1 — March 7, 2009 @ 4:11 pm | Reply

  30. @ Justice,

    IF AMERICANS BOTHER YOU THAT MUCH YOU MORON, THEN SHIP YOUR ASS BACK TO WHERE IT CAME FROM. BE GRATEFUL THAT WE ALLOWED YOUR ASS TO STAY IN THIS COUNTRY!!!

    Comment by cowgirl1 — March 7, 2009 @ 4:18 pm | Reply

  31. your saying they are not convicted yet … well i believe they wont be cause iraq cant convict an american … they will wait untill those soldiers get to america , and im sure nothing will happen to them cause unfortunatly the american government sees arab people as dogs an they dont give a crap about an iraqi 14 year old getting raped.

    Comment by linda — May 9, 2009 @ 11:42 pm | Reply

  32. “…they will wait untill those soldiers get to america , and im sure nothing will happen to them cause unfortunatly the american government sees arab people as dogs an they dont give a crap about an iraqi 14 year old getting raped.”

    Likely nothing like what they deserve will happen to them. I don’t believe that a moral people could do to them what they deserve for this act, not that I any longer claim morality, exceptional or otherwise, attributable to our government.

    It isn’t that that they see Iraqis as dogs; they see EVERYONE not one of the corporate/government/Elite-old-money-bank-families who run the government and the media as resources or a waste of resources. Kissinger and Nick Rockefeller have both referred to an “Elite” plan, after taking over the government entirely here, to “reduce the population by 50% to 80%” and to get rid of the “useless eaters” (from “Culling the Herd”), meaning those too old to work, or too injured or sick or otherwise useless, but also referring to most non-whites, as the “elites” themselves are all Europeans. As far as I can figure, their plan calls for war between ALL of Islam and America, possibly together with England, with the idea that both will be destroyed, like Germany after WWII.

    Think about it: absolutely EVERYTHING that could have been done wrong in this whole invasion and occupation was! US soldiers wree carefully kept ignorant of language and customs, they were told over and over (and still are) that ALL Iraqis are the enemies, and they have been taught and ordered repeatedly to humiliate them, but especially the males. Iraqis get as angry as anyone about being attacked and killed, but humiliation – THAT is remembered for literally centuries! And every horrible thing that could be done to people of that culture is what is SOP there and has been. That MUST be deliberate; it’s just too perfectly designed to teach the Middle East to hate us.

    The animals who do these things in Iraq will come home, and when the economy, the food supply, the fuel and water and everything else all collapse at once here, who do you think will be called upon to enforce martial law and civil obedience upon the citizens of America? We will see both sides of this evil coin before it’s over.

    Ian

    Comment by Ian MacLeod — May 31, 2009 @ 6:45 am | Reply

  33. Im not shocked about this situation. It happens a lot in all armies in the world. I have no respect for those soldiers who did that. If they were men, they wouldn’t do that to a girl. They would get their ass to a hooker and get laid! I only hate the iraqis that are abusive towards women. I dislike their laws putting down women. The only good thing about america is freedom, money, music. America is 1 of the worst places that have a lot of crime & hate. Im not glad that im a american. If I could, id would move to europe where they are decent and have a lot more peace!

    Comment by Sommer — July 1, 2009 @ 6:16 am | Reply

  34. I’ve been reading all the comments..and wow they’re different!!
    A lot of people LOVE the army and nothing can change that.
    It’s true, some american soldiers are killed in the Middle east. Do u ever wonder why? Because they are in OTHERS COUNTRY. They haven’t asked for american soldiers to bug in their territory.
    That american people think the US army is doing something “noble” just proves how blind you are.
    The USA is putting into practice a “geopolitical strategy”. I hope someone here studies international relations and they will understand what Im talking about.
    Geopolitical strategists Spykman and Mckinder said (for like 100 years ago:
    THOSE WHO CONTROL THE HEART OF THE WORLD (central asia+middle east) CONTROL THE WORLD.
    They u’r got ur explanation.
    As for the rapers, no matter who they are,what nationality they have and what circumstances…THEY HAVE TO BE PUNISHED

    Comment by S* — July 27, 2009 @ 6:03 am | Reply

  35. I really feel bad about this .. and as well as I’m not in to violence .. I swear If I saw this American big .. I’m gona make him asks for dying .

    American People , What your sons doing in Iraq may come back to you in another way , maybe regular Mujahdin do not rape people . but maybe death for every soldier worked in this actions is what he is waiting for.

    Any one he thinks that America is there because of a NOBLE thing .. Please revise your mind before god judges you and every one did not give the subject what it worth of importance

    DO YOUR ACTIONS HUMANS

    Comment by Usama — November 19, 2009 @ 7:25 am | Reply

  36. please arrest that guy and kill him
    by the way i need to be an american soldiers

    help me please

    Comment by amiin — April 25, 2010 @ 9:28 am | Reply

  37. Going through most of the discussion, I would say two words: “Fuck USA”

    Comment by ArtistDigital — December 29, 2010 @ 8:53 pm | Reply

  38. Some soldiers declared “Missing in Action” in the European theater of WWII were actually executed for rape.

    Comment by Howard T. Lewis III — March 31, 2011 @ 2:09 am | Reply

  39. These fucking soldiers are empty-headed idiots except for their full semen… this is unique to USA. They are supposed to send harlots with them for their needs if they got any brain at all!!

    Comment by Combro — May 31, 2013 @ 12:15 am | Reply


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